1. Haribol Acharya
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    Haribol Acharya Member

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    Why am I on this forum?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Haribol Acharya, Aug 1, 2008.

    Today we are divided along linguistic, cultural, economic lines. We live in fragments, divisions. But the fact is we are a whole, integrally. Through a new culture we can restore ourselves to our original and of course real nature.

    Maybe the most powerful tool for this will be literature, for literature unlike other domains of art, science or any other disciplines rise above petty attributes and encompass or embrace all classes, sections, geographies and there are no discriminatory feelings or biased attitudes at all. I believe if writers from different sections, strata or communities, national, linguistic, political unite there is every possibility that something can be done to dissuade people to discriminate one another against or be biased towards particular races, religions or economic conditions.

    I joined in the forum with this objective despite the fact that I belong to a different language community. We can interact, discuss and learn share ideas across our social backgrounds and we can apply all that learn in the communities we live in. Definitely such interactive programs through such forums can help us build up personalities and win over certain narrow sentimentalism to keep abreast of things of humanitarianly significant.

    I am a bit confusing and confounding now and you to may seem the same to me and the people in my part of the world. But we can cove such gaps and gulfs among us through ranges of interactive programs like this in point of fact.

    I am a writer in Nepali basically. Yet I do not want to be confined to my geo-political territories. I am winged to take flights in defiance of the limiting boundaries of egocentricities, unrestrictedly across all of you. You may despise me for my poor linguistic skills but I have something to say that rises above all these insignificant language, geography and economy-stuffs.

    I believe in the spirit of universality and I communicate with that desire, a desire of entrenching a universal culture that can have space for people of all domains.
     
  2. CDRW
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    CDRW Contributing Member Contributor

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    Welcome. I knew a Nepali family once. They were some of the kindest people I've ever met. The father had left a lucrative law career, and the mother a pretty important family to come over here to America just so they could give their children a better chance.

    I also hope we can help overcome our limitations and understand each other on a higher level.
     
  3. gigantes
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    gigantes Banned

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    wonderful post. wonderful issues raised. altho i don't necessarily share all your conclusions-

    agreed, and i'd throw in "educational", "intellectual", "physical health" and "gender" lines to help flesh that thought out.

    we are a whole by being human? or do you mean 'whole' in the sense of all things being connected, similar to the sense of the brachman?

    first of all, i think we've been able to experience our real nature by many means already, such as traditional tribal culture, meditation, transcendence, peak experiences, epiphanies and so forth.

    IMO it is impossible to build any new culture at this time that will be embraced by all. for one thing, because getting everyone to embrace something is pragmatically impossible. for another, because no new culture can be built while civilisation is changing so quickly (technology being the prime catalyst). with every year the rate of change increases, making any finely-tuned culture or highest breakthrough of a particular generation begin to decay immediately. pretty soon it's obsolete and has little or no message for the next generations. this effect is going on all the time all over the world and is very easily observed, altho in some places more easily than in others. when i go back to my birthplace and father's homeland of peru, for example, i see the rate of change happening much more slowly than here in the USA. but it is indeed accelerating there, also.

    again, great thoughts and i hope you share more.
     
  4. Cheeno
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    Cheeno Contributing Member

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    You feel you're being despised because of your linguistic difference? I'd certainly hate to think there'd be such narrowminded members on the forums. There are many members here who write english as a second language, and who, as far as I can tell, haven't experienced such perceived demonisation because of it. Maybe confusion. From reading reaction to your posts, I get the feeling some members are having problems understanding you, mainly because of your often disjointed syntax. In my opinion, it comes across in places as convoluted and overly rhetorical, which may lead to some members perceiving your writing as elitist, or patronising.
    In reality, though, I'm delighted you've joined us. We should all be open enough to at least accept that everyone has the right to voice their opinions, and acknowledge that we cannot achieve a world view without listening to the voices of the world, however inexpert the expression of a second language is. So, welcome. I hope, in the longer term, your interaction here brings you, and us, closer to your objective.
     
  5. sfr
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    sfr Contributing Member

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    What exactly is this? Also, gigantes you talked about how it's hard to create a new culture because in part technology is growing expoentially. Can't we create a culture that grows together?
     
  6. gigantes
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    gigantes Banned

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    where did he say that?

    the "brachman" is the ultimate source and mystery of being in the hindi tradition IIRC. it encompasses everything we know and don't know, everything that can be conceived of by humans and that which can't.

    i might not be spelling the word "brachman" correctly, tho. :p

    how?

    as soon as half a generation passes in our technocentric, individualistic culture, half of our way of looking at things is already outdated. and the faster the change occurs, the less each generation has in common with the next.
     
  7. sfr
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    sfr Contributing Member

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    Some things change very little over time, atleast one thing never changes(change). Just because a new technology is better at something doesn't mean it doesn't have the same thing in mind as the older technology. By the way I thought we were talking about creating a new culture here and now not over generations.
     
  8. gigantes
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    gigantes Banned

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    you can believe or explain it however you like, sfr, but that by itself provides no solution to the question on the table.
     
  9. Twigstar
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    Twigstar Member

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    There.

    The path to a unified culture is already way on the marks, due to technology in fact. This is the age of communications after all, and the fact that we are interacting in it's biggest fruit, the internet, is the proof in the pud. Although technology may be rapidly changing, it's face value is not. We're still deeply rooted in the mighty technology of the transistor, which is probably the greatest piece of technology to grace us. That, the transistor, is what all technologies have in common. (In so far as computers and other such communication devices).

    I don't think your slight lack of grammar is detrimental in the slightest, as far as social interaction goes. If some do take to being disgusted at your language construct, it's their ignorance of language barriers (I'm sure your grammatical rules in your language are vastly different to English), and indeed, it is them who are the pompous, up their own arse people, not you. I see the way you communicate the written word, and I see potential eloquence.

    Keep on trucking, it's clear to me you're a bright spark.
     
  10. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    Namaste Haribol, Welcome to the Writing Forums.

    I agree with your goals. Reaching out across linguistic and cultural boundries is always difficult, but also nearly always rewarding. However, although your command of English vocabulary is fine, I'm sure you are fully aware that your command of the overall language is not all the way there - yet. I intend no insult. Hopefully, we can help with some of that. I have to say, if I even had any kind of vocabulary in Nepalese(?), I would still undoubtedly do worse in overall communication in your native language.

    Posting your own work should not be the very first thing you do here. It is really worthwhile to see what other people have done to improve their writing, and see if some of it applies to your writing as well. That is part of why we require members to review other members' work before posting their own for review. On the other hand, there are no restrictions, other than content and copyright rules, on showcasing your work in your member blog.

    If you haven't explored the site yet, you should probably do so soon. Newcomers often gravitate to the Lounge, the Word Games, or the Review Room, but there is much more to be discovered if you poke in the corners. Remember to check out our FAQ as well, and be sure to read through the forum rules, too, to avoid any misunderstandings or hurt feelings. Respect for one another is our principal mandate.

    As for the Review Room, new joiners often wonder why we do things a bit differently on this site than on other writing sites. We emphasize reviewing as a critical writing skill. Training your eye by reviewing other people's work helps you improve your own writing even before you present it for others to see. Therefore, we ask members to review other people's writing before posting work of their own. The Review Room forums on this site, therefore, are true workshops, not just a bulletin board for displaying your work (and on that note, please only post each item for review in one Review Room forum). See this post, Why Write Reviews Before Posting My Work? for more information.

    Enjoy your stay here, and have fun!
     
  11. gigantes
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    gigantes Banned

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    wow, i missed that.

    well, hopefully those are just passing fears being expressed due to pushing against new boundaries.
     
  12. Haribol Acharya
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    Haribol Acharya Member

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    Thank you Cogito for your invaluable suggestions. I am really happy to be on this site along with all of you. Of course start posting on the review site try honing my skills of writing and defer posting new articles for the time being. I have ideas but when it comes to expressing them in English I get tough times. However I am sure I will get lots of cooperation on this site.
     
  13. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    it's 'Brahman'... capitalized and no 'c'... and btw, 'hindi' is the language, 'hindu' is the religion...
     
  14. TwinPanther13
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    TwinPanther13 Contributing Member

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    I am glad I stopped here cause I just posed a question in another thread you might be able to answer Haribol. What is your fantasy where you are from. I have been to europe and japan and korea, but never India or Nepal. Or for that matter south america. When an author in your country writes fantasy what does he write about? Is it elves and gnomes and dragons, or different types of creatures all together.

    I would love to know your myths and legends. The fables and all the stories the children know. What weapons are sacred, hell what weapons are used. If you have read Tolkien style fantasy like lord of the rins, I would love to know the Nepali equivalent so to speak. please let us all know
     
  15. gigantes
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    gigantes Banned

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    thank you, maia.

    btw, the "c" is a rough approximation. the correct sound should be more like a breathy prolonged sound IIRC. probably in the hindi language group there's a symbol.
     

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