1. Johncrawfordz
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    Johncrawfordz Member

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    Writing for Western or Eastern audiences?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Johncrawfordz, Jul 10, 2014.

    Good day to all

    It's my first time posting so pleasure to meet you all. Currently, I have a question that I would like to ask for your advice.

    Ok, I have been reading quite a bunch of Japanese Light novels while refining my writing skills over the past few years. I am interested in creating my own story which would be a novella as a starting stage. Now I am in a predicament in finalizing the setting for my novella / light novel.

    To my understanding, the writing styles and things that relate is different between Western and Eastern readers. The plot I have in mind seems to be very prominent for a Japanese light novel but the writing style for this doesn't seem to be a good match for an Western English based novella in my view. So I am a bit confused on choosing which style to cater to. I am trying to decide this because otherwise I cannot finalize my character names and important landmarks for the story.

    Note: This is ignoring the need for research of details regarding any location that will be selected.

    Please kindly provide your thoughts & advice on this matter.

    Thank you

    Regards,
    John Crawfordz
     
  2. Chaos Inc.
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    Chaos Inc. Active Member

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    As a person researching the differences in Eastern and Western video game styles, you'll have better luck catering to the Eastern audience and pulling some of us Westerners over.

    My reasoning is how a certain group of American nerds love their Anime and dress up like their favorite characters. I don't see many Easterners dressing up like our Western cartoon characters in conventions over there.

    Of course I could be totally wrong.
     
  3. thirdwind
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    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

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    Just FYI, publishers don't normally take on novellas because there's no market for them. Of course, this doesn't matter if you're self-publishing.

    When you say that you're writing style isn't a good match for Western readers, what does that mean? Can you elaborate on that?
     
  4. Jack Asher
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    Jack Asher Wildly experimental Contributor

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    Considering how thoroughly the Japanese can fuck up western concepts, like knighthood, werewolves, Romeo and Juliet, and Spiderman...

    How thoroughly have we fucked up their concepts?

    Write in the western style, a lifetime of study won't prepare you for the nuances a native Japanese person has understood his whole life.
     
  5. Link the Writer
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    Link the Writer Flipping Out For A Good Story. Contributor

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    We've done exactly the same thing they did with movies like the 2000 version of Godzilla or The Last Samurai with Tom Cruise. :D From what I surmise, they focus more on getting the readers to know more about the setting, the inner lives of the characters and their stories. We, however, like to jump right in. Here's a character, here's where he/she is at, here's what's going on, let's go.

    But go with your guts. If you think you can pull it off, then do so. It'll be difficult, but I think you could do it. I will say this, however. A Easterner will be able to immediately catch even the most subtle detail you missed. What makes sense for him/her would probably not make sense/even be considered by you, and vise versa.

    ***

    I'm a bit confused/curious myself. How would they portray Romeo and Juliet? I would've figured it'd be the same across the board: Two lovers fall in forbidden love and end up dying in the end.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2014
  6. Jack Asher
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    Jack Asher Wildly experimental Contributor

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    You would be completely wrong.



    For those of you who can't see the video, I'll post the synopsis from wikipedia

     
  7. Link the Writer
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    Link the Writer Flipping Out For A Good Story. Contributor

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    Wait, that's Romeo and Juliet? As in their idea of what Shakespeare had in mind, not like...The Lion King which is basically Hamlet with lions?

    Their style is both intriguing and confusing at the same time. The video you posted sounds lovely to the ears, and the animation is beautiful to look at. I just might watch it. :D Reading/watching how Easterners do their tales is very thought-provoking and educational.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2014
  8. thirdwind
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    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

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    To me, the Romeo and Juliet thing isn't an example of stylistic differences. I took "style" in the OP to mean "prose style."
     
  9. Siena
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    Siena Active Member

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    Big mistake to think that these are all that different.

    Sure there are cultural differences, just like there are cultural differences between New Yorkers and Texans and between Americans and Europeans…

    But underneath, from a storytelling perspective, you're doing the same things.
     
    TDFuhringer likes this.

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