1. DeadMoon
    Offline

    DeadMoon Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2014
    Messages:
    756
    Likes Received:
    441
    Location:
    fargo, ND

    writing something outside of your safety genre

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by DeadMoon, Dec 22, 2014.

    Between reading, writing, watching (old horror movies), collecting and thinking - Horror takes up at least 65 - 75% of my life. Now with my son's first Christmas fast approaching and with our friends, who play Santa and ms clause, stopping over to the house to visit him and My mother giving my items (blankets, toys ect...) that I used as a baby 35 years ago (still great condition). I find myself full of Ideas for short stories that I would otherwise never think about. Mushy, feel good, family style story telling.

    Has this happened to anyone else? A sudden desire to drastically change the genre you feel more comfortable and happy in.
     
  2. Steerpike
    Online

    Steerpike Felis amatus Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2010
    Messages:
    11,122
    Likes Received:
    5,321
    Location:
    California, US
    Yeah. I write whatever story suits me. Horror, fantasy, and science fiction mostly. But I've done a children's story, a YA, thriller, and romance. It's a good idea to read in the genre you are contemplating.
     
  3. BayView
    Offline

    BayView Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2014
    Messages:
    5,665
    Likes Received:
    5,159
    I think it's fine to switch genres (although publishers don't like it much) but you might also want to try to include some of the emotions and 'mushiness' you're feeling into your traditional genre. I mean, horror is supposed to scare readers, right? It's supposed to expose their fears and push them to the edge of comfort? If you can bring some of the cozy domesticity you're enjoying to your writing, making readers really FEEL how much your characters love their kids or whatever, and then let the horror in to tear that apart? It could be really powerful.

    Remember Pet Semetary? We could really feel the MC's despair, and understand why he was driven to do what he did as he fought to regain the domestic bliss he'd experienced before the accident.

    Now, on your first Xmas with your son, possibly you don't want to write about re-animated dead toddlers! But you could have something threatening a baby, and that threat is what drives the MC to keep fighting against the horror, or whatever.

    Or you can go full mushy, for sure. Just thought I'd introduce another possibility!
     
    DeadMoon likes this.
  4. theoriginalmonsterman
    Offline

    theoriginalmonsterman Pickle Contest Administrator Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2014
    Messages:
    528
    Likes Received:
    252
    Location:
    [REDACTED]
    I personally try to use a combination of different genres in my writing, so I'm not just focusing on one thing. The only genre I would say I never tried was romance simply, because I don't want to get into that ._.
     
  5. DeadMoon
    Offline

    DeadMoon Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 7, 2014
    Messages:
    756
    Likes Received:
    441
    Location:
    fargo, ND
    I love the Book Pet Semetary, (even named our cat church after the movie came out since our cat looked identical to the movie cat) I am thinking of working the story two ways since it is not very long. One will be the safe,cozy feel good type and the other will add elements of horror and suspense.
     
    BayView likes this.
  6. Cogito
    Online

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    35,935
    Likes Received:
    2,043
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Well, I've never had much of an inclination to actual change my primary genre, but I do dabble in other kinds of writing. For example, I'm not drawn very strongly to poetry, but I've attempted a few poems as a learning exploration.

    Stepping out of your comfort zone is scary and empowering. And then you look back and find that your comfort zone has grown considerably.
     
    DeadMoon likes this.

Share This Page