1. peachalulu

    peachalulu Member Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    May 20, 2012
    Messages:
    3,921
    Likes Received:
    2,526
    Location:
    occasionally Oz , mainly Canada

    Adjectives always before verbs? Lazily swayed or swayed lazily?

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by peachalulu, Jun 25, 2012.

    I'm working on a short story and every once in a while, I come to a point where a sentence can give me issues.
    Here's one of them.
    The fringed canopy lazily swayed.
    Or The fringed canopy swayed, lazily.
    Does one of them not work , is it a matter of good grammer , or creative difference?
     
  2. Darkkin

    Darkkin Reflection of a nobody Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2012
    Messages:
    1,755
    Likes Received:
    517
    Location:
    Following the footprints in the sand...
    Lazily swayed is an adjective.

    Swayed lazily is an adverb.

    Am I over thinking this? If I am, sorry. :rolleyes:

    - Darkkin
     
  3. Cogito

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    35,899
    Likes Received:
    2,095
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Lazily is always an adverb, not an adjective. An adjective modifies a noun.

    An adverb modifies a verb, an adjective, or another adverb.

    In English, adjectives usually precede the noun, but can appear in other places in the sentence:

    Adverbs can appear before or after the verb. Adverbs modifying an adjective or another adverb are typically placed before the word they modify.
     
  4. mammamaia

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,235
    Likes Received:
    1,015
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    yes, that...

    but many times, an adverb will not work or read well when placed before what it's modifying... such as in the sample, 'lazily swayed... 'swayed lazily' works/reads much better, imo... that said, placement will also depend on the sentence and context...
     
  5. minstrel

    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2010
    Messages:
    9,431
    Likes Received:
    6,055
    Location:
    Near Los Angeles
    Placement may also depend on cultural and dialect issues. There's a construction I've come to regard as Irish, because I first found it in Joyce and since in the work of other Irish writers that works like this:

    He slammed the door loudly. (Normal for me)
    He loudly slammed the door. (Also normal for me)
    He slammed loudly the door. (Irish)
     
  6. peachalulu

    peachalulu Member Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    May 20, 2012
    Messages:
    3,921
    Likes Received:
    2,526
    Location:
    occasionally Oz , mainly Canada
    Thanks for the help!
     
  7. Estrade

    Estrade New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2012
    Messages:
    43
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    England
    Verb before adverb feels more straightforward.

    Adverb before verb feels more poetic, which means it can end up being more purple.
     
  8. mammamaia

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,235
    Likes Received:
    1,015
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    good point...
     

Share This Page