1. b4Db0Yx

    b4Db0Yx New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2013
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0

    Comma when using thus.

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by b4Db0Yx, Mar 29, 2013.

    Are the following phrases correct?

    The party was paid for by our students and not the college, thus making criticism irrelevant.
    The party was paid for by our students and not the college; thus, it makes criticism irrelevant. (NB)
    The party was paid for by our students and not the college. Thus, it makes criticism irrelevant.

    Note: the first punctuation sign is a semicolon and not a comma.
     
  2. thirdwind

    thirdwind Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    Messages:
    7,489
    Likes Received:
    2,994
    Location:
    Boston
    Yes, they're all correct.
     
  3. b4Db0Yx

    b4Db0Yx New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2013
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Does this rule comma + thus + verb (with -ing) apply to the other long linkers such as consequently, therefore, however, nevertheless, hence, henceforth, in fact?

    The party was paid for by our students and not the college, consequently/therefore/hence making criticism irrelevant.
     
  4. b4Db0Yx

    b4Db0Yx New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2013
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Does this rule comma + thus + verb (with -ing) apply to the other conjunctive adverbs such as consequently, therefore, however, nevertheless, hence, henceforth, in fact?

    The party was paid for by our students and not the college, consequently/therefore/hence making criticism irrelevant.

    Or, is this the rule ? When linking independent sentences you use semicolon+comma and when linking independent sentences and one of those sentences doesn't have a subject you just use a comma before.
     
  5. thirdwind

    thirdwind Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    Messages:
    7,489
    Likes Received:
    2,994
    Location:
    Boston
    This rule doesn't work for all conjunctive adverbs ("however" is one such example).

    You use a semicolon for two closely related independent sentences (a period separating the two sentences works as well). You use a comma when the first sentence is an independent sentence and the second part is a phrase with an -ing verb. That's sort of the rule to go by.

    You are probably better off consulting a grammar book or looking online. I don't think I'm doing a good job of explaining this.
     
  6. b4Db0Yx

    b4Db0Yx New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2013
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    I did understand what you said but I think I also found an example in which you use only a comma but the next verb doesn't have (-ing), but it might just be incorrect. If only I can recall that phrase.
     
  7. mammamaia

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,235
    Likes Received:
    1,015
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    it's clearly a comma, so i don't get this..
     
  8. evelon

    evelon Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2009
    Messages:
    611
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    England
    Think the note relates to the second line (NB at the end). In this line the first punctuation is a semi-colon.
     
  9. madhoca

    madhoca Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 1, 2008
    Messages:
    2,524
    Likes Received:
    88
    Location:
    the shadow of the velvet fortress
    You can also have no punctuation before "thus".
    You do it thus: see?
     

Share This Page