Differences in UK/US/Canadian/Australian English

Discussion in 'Research' started by Tenderiser, Feb 20, 2017.

  1. Cassandra Leo

    Cassandra Leo New Member

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    Unfortunately, I can't contribute to this list (because I'm not a native speaker), but the idea is brilliant! :)

    May I use this spreadsheet in educational purposes? (just for my personal use)
     
  2. Oscar Leigh

    Oscar Leigh Contributor Contributor

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    "Rooting" is sometimes used a Aussie slang for sex. More commonly among urban lower lower class or in rural areas.
     
  3. Oscar Leigh

    Oscar Leigh Contributor Contributor

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    We call it tomato sauce and no ketchup in Australia. Don't know if someone got that one.
     
  4. Oscar Leigh

    Oscar Leigh Contributor Contributor

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    Ooh! I know one! Americans use "pissed" like "he was PISSED" like angry, but in Australia "pissed" is drunk, and "pissed off" is angry.
    Also, we adopted the British "buggered" for tired as slang.
    Third thing "avo" is sometimes used as slang for afternoon. Like; "see you this avo".
    "Abo" is slang for the aboriginal people, generally avoided because it's slightly associated with racism, nto as heavily as "nigger" so it's still used but it's more likely to be used by someone old-fashioned or insensitive.
     
  5. Oscar Leigh

    Oscar Leigh Contributor Contributor

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    'Straya is slang for Australia, often used in a patriotic thing. E.g. drunk lads on Australia day might run around shouting "'Straya!". The slang is based off a heavy Australian accent where it is pronounced "Astraya"
     
  6. Oscar Leigh

    Oscar Leigh Contributor Contributor

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    Same in Aus
     
  7. jannert

    jannert Member Supporter Contributor

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    Just to add to the ruckus ....just checked my American cookbooks. They seem to refer to 'mashed potatoes' as a dish you'd eat as they are. But if you use them to make something else, such as a crust or topping or pancakes, they're referred to as Mashed Potato (Crust or Topping or Pancakes.)
     
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  8. Oscar Leigh

    Oscar Leigh Contributor Contributor

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    That is disturbed. :eek:
     
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  9. jannert

    jannert Member Supporter Contributor

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    I think it all depends on whether or not 'potato' is used as a noun or an adjective.

    However, my 71-year-old Scottish husband (who is the world's biggest stickler for correct usage) just chimed in with: 'you can say either mashed potato or mashed potatoes.' When referring to the dish. Which is borne out by folks around here saying: "Would you like stewed apples for dessert?" They would never say "stewed apple" in that context.
     
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  10. Tenderiser

    Tenderiser Not a man Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor Community Volunteer

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    Of course!
     
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  11. Cassandra Leo

    Cassandra Leo New Member

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    Great! It's so kind of you
     
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  12. IHaveNoName

    IHaveNoName Senior Member Community Volunteer

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    Here are a few more. I'll list US first, then UK:

    Vacation/holiday
    Tire/Tyre
    Curb/Kerb
    Ground floor/First Storey, first floor/second storey (I'm not sure what they call the basement in the UK).
    GPS (in vehicles)/Navi
     
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  13. Tenderiser

    Tenderiser Not a man Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor Community Volunteer

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    Ooh, where in the UK do you use navi? I've only ever heard it called satnav.

    We call the basement the basement, or the cellar, or sometimes (mostly in shopping malls) the 'lower ground floor'. Because I suppose they don't want to send their customers to the basement after all those horror movies...
     
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  14. Pinkymcfiddle

    Pinkymcfiddle Banned

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    Navi strikes me as the sort of hideous affectation used by Sloane Rangers, but I've never heard it used either.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2017
  15. Wreybies

    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Supporter Contributor

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    In the US a duvet is a very specific thing. A comforter is a one-piece thing where the decorative pattern or whatnot is intrinsic to it. A duvet is basically a giant pillow-case into which you put a (usually) down comforter that is otherwise plain white and not decorative. This allows you to make use of the inner part (which is expensive) with any number of different decorative outer coverings.
     
  16. matwoolf

    matwoolf Contributor Contributor

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    'Comforters' haven't been invented yet in the UK. We have duvets and duvet covers. You climb inside the duvet cover to insert the duvet. We have memories of sheets & blankets.
     
  17. Spencer1990

    Spencer1990 Contributor Contributor

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    I've never known what a duvet is until now. Thanks for clarifying. I did, however, know that it was in the same useless vein as throw pillows. My wife loves those fuckin' things and I will never understand why. They just end up on the floor.
     
  18. Wreybies

    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Supporter Contributor

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    Ah, understood. Yes, you will hear Americans call the outer covering a duvet cover as well, but we don't call the inner part a duvet, ever. That's always called a comforter. If you say down comforter to an American, it's understood that it will need a duvet (cover) because they are always plain white and not decorative. If you just say comforter, it's understood to be the one-piece kind that requires no assembly.
     
  19. big soft moose

    big soft moose All killer, no filler. Contributor Community Volunteer

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    they're used to prop up legs and stuff while trying out more exotic positions.... at least what I use them for, its possible it wasn't the original intention
     
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  20. Homer Potvin

    Homer Potvin Bing Bang Boom

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    Right? I nearly break my neck every time I try to navigate the bedroom in the dark. Why do we need seven pillows when the square footage of the bed can only support four once the humans are added?
     
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  21. big soft moose

    big soft moose All killer, no filler. Contributor Community Volunteer

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    I thought a comforter in the US was what we call a dummy ... one of those plastic teat things for babies to suck n to shut the little so and so's up
     
  22. Spencer1990

    Spencer1990 Contributor Contributor

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    I've never run into a position that needed throw pillows to pull off, but I'll keep this idea in mind, haha. It'd put them to use, for sure.

    My wife will randomly come home with new ones sometimes. Last count, we had six pillows that go on the floor next to the bed every single night. WHY?!
     
  23. Tenderiser

    Tenderiser Not a man Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor Community Volunteer

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    Think that's a 'pacifer' in the US.
     
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  24. Spencer1990

    Spencer1990 Contributor Contributor

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    Sí, verdad.
     
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  25. Wreybies

    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Supporter Contributor

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    Yes, a pacifier.
     
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