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  1. SethLoki

    SethLoki Retired Autodidact Contributor

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    Hard Books for Hard times...

    Discussion in 'Book Discussion' started by SethLoki, Jul 14, 2017.

    matwoolf and Rosacrvx like this.
  2. Homer Potvin

    Homer Potvin We may just go where no-one's been.... Contributor

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    This was the paragraph that jumped out at me:

    "As the introduction of photography affected the role of painting, or as film altered the place of novels in the 20th century, new narrative forms are inevitably affecting the place and purpose of the novel. As the basic need for storytelling is catered for to a large extent by TV dramas, it MAY be that readers turn to the novel for something else, something new."

    I'm not sure about the "may" part at the end. I mean, I can see a bit of a return to more literary fiction or something that differentiates itself from the "simpler" storytelling begot by the television attention span, but I'm not sure what that would look like. Personally, I would welcome it, whatever it is.
     
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  3. SethLoki

    SethLoki Retired Autodidact Contributor

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    Yes, whenever I read 'may' in that kind of context my default setting is cynical. Also, I see some overlap with what's said as a proportion of those TV dramatisations mentioned, with their 'narrative form', are actually adaptations of novels, chosen specifically for their literary uniqueness. I'm thinking of American Gods of late as a case in point, how well it was written, how difficult it was to pin down its genre and its prophetic indictment.

    I'm heartened by the news in general though of the revitalised demand both by publishers and readers for works that break ground for being abstract with prose and their non-linear innovative plot/character devices. Given it's a real slog now to make a living as an author, there's solace to be had by those who don't usually get a sniff at being taken on—in that they 'may' witness a little more openness to new ideas.
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2017
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  4. Cave Troll

    Cave Troll They'll never take our humor! :D Contributor

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    Problem is it is hard to find anything modern (past 10-15yrs)
    that is worth reading. Not to mention those who just write
    book after book on the same thing over and over again, with
    out ever really changing things all that much.
    When you read some big pop book, and it is written so dully
    or simply, that it makes you want to bash your head on the
    desk repeatedly going: "Who thought this shit was good?"
    You have to take into account that people like the same
    familiar things within a genres, and don't like deviation
    from that familiarity. Which means in turn the readers
    are just as cliche as the drivel they read.

    Also the article does not take into account that it all has
    been done before, so what groundbreaking thing are they
    talking about? Photography does not compare to painting,
    a few seconds vs. hours/days/weeks of work. One takes
    pure chance, the other takes years to master. Anyone
    can take a bloody picture.
     

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