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  1. g_man526

    g_man526 Member

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    I feel silly for asking...

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by g_man526, Apr 19, 2013.

    But is there a verb to describe the motion one makes with one's hands when messing up their hair? "Thrashing about" just sounds like they're having a convulsive episode, and shaking their hands sounds too "weak" too describe the act.

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. erebh

    erebh Contributing Member Contributor

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    tussling?
     
  3. Thornesque

    Thornesque Contributing Member

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    Tousling. That's what I would use, at any rate. Though I've heard some English people say "mussed."

    Tussle is actually a different thing altogether. To "tussle" with someone means to get into an altercation, usually physical, with another person.
     
  4. SwampDog

    SwampDog Contributing Member

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    Concur with tousling or mussing. 'Me 'air's all mussed up!'
     
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  5. whgoss

    whgoss Member

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    What about ruffle?

    LOL @ SwampDog
     
  6. g_man526

    g_man526 Member

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    AH! Yes, that's the one. Thank you, and sorry to trouble you all. I told you I felt silly asking, because it did feel like it was at the tip of my tongue.
     
  7. Cogito

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    I do not recommend tousling hair with a tongue tip.
     
  8. minstrel

    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

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    That's only because you aren't a cat.
     
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  9. Cogito

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    Purrfect response. Kudos.

    Sorry, that deserved rep, but I am prevented.
     
  10. Trish

    Trish I've been deleted.. again Contributor

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    LOL! Yep, it really does :) (I can't give it to him either, sigh)
     
  11. mammamaia

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    tousle, muss, or ruffle are often used for what you are asking about, gman...
     
  12. Jhunter

    Jhunter Mmm, bacon. Contributor

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    Hahaha.
     
  13. jannert

    jannert Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

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    Well, if you're really stuck for a word, you can always use the Scottish all-rounder "thingme." He thingme-d his hair. Then he thingme-d his watch, shut the thingme behind him, and headed off for his daily thingme. Those of us with aphasia use this word a lot, in conversation! :redface: Funny—we nearly always know what it means!
     
  14. Roobear

    Roobear New Member

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    Definitely ruffle or tousle. As an English person I've never used mussed, but i might be an exception
     
  15. DopePoet

    DopePoet New Member

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    Tousling sounds right but the spelling looks wrong. Never heard of "mussed" here in the states.

    Other possibilities: tossed, flipped, fluffed. Ruffle and "tousle" are probably the best suggestions.
     
  16. GingerCoffee

    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

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    I like 'mussed'.
     
  17. skistovasti

    skistovasti Member

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    I agree. I always imagined it as "tussling", not "tousling". The latter just looks weird. Never heard of "mussed", either, but I do like the way it sounds and looks.
     
  18. skyeseven

    skyeseven New Member

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    Tousling and ruffling are the words I normally use/see. Dishevel, mess up, mess, muss up, muss are all other words you could use as well, but they've been said. I enjoy muss/muss up. The words themselves create the image you're trying to portray, don't they?
     
  19. rachyroo

    rachyroo New Member

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    "ruffles?"

    "tousled" is the end result of a bit of ruffling if you want to be pernickety.
     
  20. Cogito

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    Being equally persnickety, tousles and ruffed can both act as either verbs or adjectives.
     

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