1. cutecat22

    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    2,523
    Likes Received:
    1,099
    Location:
    England

    Remember when we talked about the use of Cum?

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by cutecat22, Sep 17, 2014.

    Well, what if I want to write:

    scarf-cum-blindfold

    or

    scarf-come-blindfold

    or scarf/blindfold

    ???
     
  2. Wreybies

    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    21,204
    Likes Received:
    13,463
    Location:
    Puerto Rico
    I'm assuming you're using it in its other meaning of combined with or also used as, yes? Be that the case, it's a different word, and come cannot substitute for it. It would be cum.
     
  3. cutecat22

    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    2,523
    Likes Received:
    1,099
    Location:
    England
    Yes I am (also used as)

    And that's what I thought but after the last discussion we had regarding the word cum, I thought I'd check.

    :)
     
    Wreybies likes this.
  4. Wreybies

    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    21,204
    Likes Received:
    13,463
    Location:
    Puerto Rico
    Yurp. ;) In this case, the word has a different etymology and is a direct pull from Latin cum, meaning with or together with. Note the similarity to the Spanish preposition con (arroz con pollo), which has the same meaning.
     
    cutecat22 likes this.
  5. Lewdog

    Lewdog Come ova here and give me kisses! Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2012
    Messages:
    7,669
    Likes Received:
    2,973
    Location:
    Williamsburg, KY
    Can't you just say scarf, blindfold combo? To me when you start mixing Latin with English words things start to get awkward.
     
  6. cutecat22

    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    2,523
    Likes Received:
    1,099
    Location:
    England
    I could, but the sentence at the moment reads "I can picture him now, in the introverted and strange darkness of the scarf-cum-blindfold."

    I'm editing the bit of erotica I shared on here a while ago.

    @Wreybies as always you are the voice of reason. Thanks x
     
  7. BayView

    BayView Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2014
    Messages:
    8,368
    Likes Received:
    8,174
    I think especially in erotica, I'd avoid the word in that context. I know, it's a useful word, but I really think it's kind of been ruined by the other meaning. I know what it means, and in a piece of writing from a different era it wouldn't jar me, but in something contemporary, it would.

    Assuming you've already established that the scarf is being used over the character's eyes, I think I'd just go with "blindfold", with no need to reiterate that it used to be used as a scarf.
     
  8. cutecat22

    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    2,523
    Likes Received:
    1,099
    Location:
    England
    Tu
    that was my feeling to start with. I don't use the word "cum" in erotica, I prefer come, orgasmed, climaxed etc. the scarf, until this point, has been called a scarf but I didn't want to go straight in and call it a blindfold. I don't want to stop readers reading because they are thinking "blindfold? It was a scarf two minutes ago?" Hence the reason for scarf-cum-blindfold.

    Hmmm
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2014
  9. GingerCoffee

    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2013
    Messages:
    17,836
    Likes Received:
    6,158
    Location:
    Ralph's side of the island.
    Why mix languages in this situation? I'm sorry, I don't get it and I don't think many readers will either.

    I would understand 'magna cum laude' or 'cum laude'. And I would recognize 'con' used meaning 'with' because Spanish phrases like 'con queso' are commonly heard. I might understand the use of 'sans', because I use it myself, but also we see it commonly with "Medecins sans Frontieres" (Doctors without Borders).

    But I've never seen 'cum' used the way you are contemplating and even worse, I think 'semen' first when I see the word, cum. :oops:
     
  10. Jack Asher

    Jack Asher Wildly experimental Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2013
    Messages:
    3,554
    Likes Received:
    2,070
    Location:
    Denver
    Agreed, my first thought was of ejaculate. In the context of erotica as well as the context of a blindfold I would call the use of the word ill advised.
     
  11. cutecat22

    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    2,523
    Likes Received:
    1,099
    Location:
    England
    I would agree were it not for the fact that the phrase is hyphenated.

    That's what makes the big difference from it being sex related. The whole definition of the word cum, in English, is:

    —used in hyphenated phrases to link nouns that describe a person or thing with two jobs, uses, etc.
     
  12. ChickenFreak

    ChickenFreak Contributor Contributor Community Volunteer

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2010
    Messages:
    11,807
    Likes Received:
    8,453
    I've seen it frequently and wouldn't give it a second thought. I read a lot of British novels, mostly murder mysteries, from the first half of the twentieth century; I would very tentatively guess that this is where I've seen it.
     
    cutecat22 likes this.
  13. BayView

    BayView Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2014
    Messages:
    8,368
    Likes Received:
    8,174
    I think that's where I'm used to seeing it, too.

    And in those places I wouldn't give it a second thought either.

    But in a piece of contemporary erotica?
     
    cutecat22 likes this.
  14. Cogito

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    35,899
    Likes Received:
    2,095
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    Also, it would not be hyphenated.

    scarf cum blindfold

    Also note that this (foreign word) is one of the correct uses of italics.
     
    cutecat22 and Wreybies like this.
  15. elynne

    elynne Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2011
    Messages:
    236
    Likes Received:
    141
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    as a counterpoint, I've seen "boat cum dinghy" or whatever several times. it does come across as old-fashioned nowdays, but it is still used. I would avoid using it in an erotica piece, though, because--yeah. for the same reason you might want to avoid phrases like "he sat stiffly erect in the chair."
     
    BayView and cutecat22 like this.
  16. GingerCoffee

    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2013
    Messages:
    17,836
    Likes Received:
    6,158
    Location:
    Ralph's side of the island.
    Can you use it in a sentence for me? Maybe if I could see how it is used....
     
    cutecat22 likes this.
  17. thirdwind

    thirdwind Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    Messages:
    7,489
    Likes Received:
    2,994
    Location:
    Boston
    It's usually hyphenated. This is according to Merriam-Webster and the New Oxford English Dictionary.
     
    cutecat22 likes this.
  18. ChickenFreak

    ChickenFreak Contributor Contributor Community Volunteer

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2010
    Messages:
    11,807
    Likes Received:
    8,453
    Some examples from a Googling through dictionaries:

    My garage-cum-workshop is well equipped.

    She appointed the actor-cum-diplomat to the post.

    The hotel has a small bar-cum-restaurant.


    However, I tend to agree with Cogito that I don't usually see it with hyphens. I think that I'd expect it to be

    My garage cum workshop is well equipped.

    She appointed the actor cum diplomat to the post.

    The hotel has a small bar cum restaurant.
     
  19. thirdwind

    thirdwind Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    Messages:
    7,489
    Likes Received:
    2,994
    Location:
    Boston
    It's usually not italicized since it's been a part of the English language for several centuries now, so it's not considered to be a foreign word.

    Also, the New York Times, New Yorker, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, and Chicago Tribune all use hyphens. That's how I would write it.
     
    cutecat22 likes this.
  20. Jack Asher

    Jack Asher Wildly experimental Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 4, 2013
    Messages:
    3,554
    Likes Received:
    2,070
    Location:
    Denver
    That's weird, because all the examples I see up there are using hyphens.

    I would suggest that if all the Dictionaries are doing it, they might have some legitimate input where the English language is concerned.
     
  21. ChickenFreak

    ChickenFreak Contributor Contributor Community Volunteer

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2010
    Messages:
    11,807
    Likes Received:
    8,453
    I wade through the sarcasm to note that I am curious as to why the dictionaries don't match what I'm used to seeing. It may, again, be the difference between early-twentieth-century British and current usage.
     
    Jack Asher likes this.
  22. Lewdog

    Lewdog Come ova here and give me kisses! Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2012
    Messages:
    7,669
    Likes Received:
    2,973
    Location:
    Williamsburg, KY
    I hope you were wearing hip-waders.
     
    cutecat22 likes this.
  23. cutecat22

    cutecat22 The Strange One Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2014
    Messages:
    2,523
    Likes Received:
    1,099
    Location:
    England
    I think there is a possibility that language, like so many other things, has changed over time. There are things out there that primarily have one use rather than multiple uses and as the hyphenated phrase was to explains that something had two uses, the odds are now that you have two objects rather than one.

    Shopping list-cum-reminder board. (Not seen one since I was in the war museum.)

    Apron-cum-peg bag. (Haven't kept my pegs in my apron pocket since ... Actually I never have but my grandmother did.)

    Light fitting-cum-power point. My gandmother's sewing machine had a power cord but rather than be plugged into a wall socket, it was plugged into the hanging light fitting!!!!
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2014
  24. stevesh

    stevesh Banned Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2008
    Messages:
    967
    Likes Received:
    648
    Location:
    Mid-Michigan USA
    I'm with @Cogito. Italics, but no hyphens. It is a non-English word, no matter how long it's been used, and the italics would help differentiate it from it's pornographic homonym.
     
  25. thirdwind

    thirdwind Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    Messages:
    7,489
    Likes Received:
    2,994
    Location:
    Boston
    Then we should italicize words like a priori, ad hoc, habeas corpus, avant-garde, per capita, camouflage, and en route (among many other words) as well. But we don't. That's because they've been a part of the English language a long time. This is consistent with the CMoS, Merriam-Webster dictionary, and a few other style guides I've seen.
     
    Jack Asher and cutecat22 like this.

Share This Page