1. Published on Amazon? If you have a book, e-book, or audiobook available on Amazon.com, we'll promote it on WritingForums.org for free. Simply add your book to our Member Publications section. Add your book here or read the full announcement.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Dismiss Notice
  1. Wickedstorm

    Wickedstorm Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2012
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New Orleans, LA

    Spelling of a word that isn't in the dictionary

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by Wickedstorm, Nov 27, 2012.

    Alright so I am working and striving really hard to make sure that my spelling my novel is as close to spot on as possible. I am using a word that is a modern almost slang like word. I have looked up the use of the of the beginning word and it's not considered a prefix but it does come with other words as examples. The first word is Mini the dictionary sites Miniskirt, and Minicomputer so I assume that the following will be correct as well. Miniorgasm.

    Now if this is consider inappropriate delete away. But I am using it in way that though it referring to something sexual itself is not.

    If not the other options is Mini with a space or Mini with a hyphen. Any help is appreciated. I understand if this post gets deleted.
     
  2. popsprocket

    popsprocket Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2012
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    2
    Mini with a space or with a hyphen is how I would word it. Probably with a hyphen since you want to associate the two words closely.

    It's true that mini itself isn't a prefix, but that doesn't mean it can just be tagged onto the front of a word. Besides which, saying 'miniskirt' refers to a completely different concept than a 'mini skirt'.
     
  3. Wickedstorm

    Wickedstorm Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2012
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New Orleans, LA
    Mini means something small or shortened.
    noun
    1.miniskirt.
    2.a minicomputer.
    3.anything of a small, reduced, or miniature size.

    adjective
    4.of the length of a miniskirt.

    a combining form with the meanings “of a small or reduced size in comparison with others of its kind” ( minicalculator; minicar; minigun ); “limited in scope, intensity, or duration” ( miniboom; minicourse; minirecession ); (of clothing) “short, not reaching the knee” ( minidress; miniskirt ).

    The usage here for the word I am trying to figure out is similar to Miniboom, minicourse, minirecession. So I am not sure if it works. I need something more concrete before I finalize my choice.
     
  4. geniegirl027

    geniegirl027 Member

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2012
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Kansas, US
    If you are the author and you make a word up, if it does not exist, can't any spelling be used?... I don't know if this is really a word.. but it would seem to me you could do what you want with your novel. =)
     
  5. Wickedstorm

    Wickedstorm Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2012
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New Orleans, LA
    This true, but I am trying to get as close to an accurate spelling as possible.
     
  6. popsprocket

    popsprocket Member

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2012
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    2
    I understand what you want to accomplish, but there's no general consensus on hyphenation. There're loose rules, but in most cases the use of a hyphen is only done to make something a mite clearer than it was before.

    In this instance, joining mini and orgasm uses mini in its combining form, which utilises a hyphen. Otherwise, you could look at it from the perspective of creating a compound word out of an adjective and a noun - which still uses a hyphen.

    You could still argue that it's not necessary since it's just an [adjective] [noun] clause, but if you want to create a single clause out of the two, then a hyphen will give you the most clarity.
     
  7. Wickedstorm

    Wickedstorm Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2012
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New Orleans, LA
    See now that is more the concrete I needed. Hyphen it is!
     
  8. mammamaia

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,017
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    i'm a professional editor and advise using the hyphen...
     
  9. Wickedstorm

    Wickedstorm Member

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2012
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    New Orleans, LA
    Thank you Mammamaia the Hyphen has been embraced in this instance. I haven't run into any other words I am not sure of yet, but I am pretty sure I will come across some as I am writing really heavily for the next 28 days. :-D
     

Share This Page