1. Pisces21

    Pisces21 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 15, 2013
    Messages:
    25
    Likes Received:
    4

    The Fairytale/ Folklore Genre

    Discussion in 'By the Genre' started by Pisces21, Nov 4, 2014.

    One genre that has really been of interest to me recently is fairytale/folklore genre. I discovered my passion for this genre earlier this year when my favorite professor ( who was in the political science department) would make mention of them. Being a senior, I was weary( yet appreciative) of the pretentiousness of academic philosophical insight and intrigue and I was just blown away by the simple yet deep moral insights conveyed by way of story. I have always hated that folktales/fables/fairytales are considered to be "for kids" because no matter how far we get in life ("far"..) , there will never be a point where we can't all benefit from the invoking of pre-modern wisdom that so many of these stories contain.

    My question to you all is 3 fold:
    a) There's always referencing to legendary folktales ( that's almost what defines them), but do you think there's any room for a contemporary author to be a "folktale" specialist? I like the idea of writing your own folktales/fairytales because it presents you with your own opportunity to shed your own wisdom your unique experiences have taught you.

    b) Until now, I've used the terms, "folktale', "fairy tale", and "fable" interchangably but what is the exact difference, if there is any?

    c) What do you think of the genre(s)? DO you enjoy them? Do you agree with me?

    Sincerely,
    An aspiring folktale writer
     
  2. GingerCoffee

    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2013
    Messages:
    17,837
    Likes Received:
    6,161
    Location:
    Ralph's side of the island.
    Yes I think there is room and a market for new fairytale/folklore. I have a friend who wrote a trilogy I think fell in that category and I love the story.

    Stolen

    The forest is alive, babies are stolen, and a story ensues. I always viewed her trilogy as a new fairytale.
     
  3. shadowwalker

    shadowwalker Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 27, 2011
    Messages:
    3,274
    Likes Received:
    844
  4. jannert

    jannert Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Messages:
    9,677
    Likes Received:
    9,531
    Location:
    Scotland
    I do absolutely love this 'genre,' and have been reading them every since I was a child. I have a pretty big collection here at home, actually. What's especially fun is branching out, away from the stories we recognise as the 'fairy tales' of our childhood into folklore from different nations, places and ethnic groups. Some similarities and lots of differences! I have never made a study of them, but no reason you couldn't. Other people certainly have done so.

    The two volumes sitting beside my bed at the moment are:

    Russian Gypsy Tales - by James Riordan (a totally enjoyable, lively, and unpredictible collection - a favourite)
    East of the Sun and West of the Moon - by Peter Asbjørnsen (great title, eh? I'm still reading this one)

    I don't think I've ever wanted to write one of these stories myself, but they certainly contain truths that I've used in my own writings at times. Sometimes subconsciously, sometimes consciously. They are very very old notions that have not lost their ability to snare the imagination, and as such, deserve respect. Many come from traditions that were never written down until recently. Some are more entertaining than others. Some have aspects of different religions hooked into them. Some are morality tales. Some are just tales of what things 'are' or what they might be, with very little morality to them at all. It's a very rich seam to mine.
     
    GingerCoffee likes this.
  5. GingerCoffee

    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2013
    Messages:
    17,837
    Likes Received:
    6,161
    Location:
    Ralph's side of the island.
    @jannert reminds me of how much I loved fairy tales as a young child. I remember a time I couldn't get enough of them.
     
  6. jannert

    jannert Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Messages:
    9,677
    Likes Received:
    9,531
    Location:
    Scotland
    Anybody remember that GREAT Jim Henson series with John Hurt, called The Storyteller? I have that on DVD and watch it at least once a year. The best filmed fairy tales ever, in my opinion.
     
  7. peachalulu

    peachalulu Member Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    May 20, 2012
    Messages:
    3,922
    Likes Received:
    2,526
    Location:
    occasionally Oz , mainly Canada
    Anything is ripe for a revival if you do it well. Personally, I love fairy tales. I love doing my own twists on them. And I love reading them especially if they keep that fairy tale feeling like Angela Carter's The Bloody Chamber and her book of Fairy Tales or George MacDonald - The Golden key - awesome!
     
  8. A.M.P.

    A.M.P. People Buy My Books for the Bio Photo Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2013
    Messages:
    2,049
    Likes Received:
    1,158
    Location:
    A Place with no History
    I was considering somthing similar myself.

    True love, mysterious dark magic, good vs evil, enchanted forests... Ive been into the idea of fairy tales and folklore evry since I read the tale of thebbrothers grossbart (title may be off) and waned to tinker in the style myself.
     

Share This Page