Wanted: Proofreader who speaks Croatian (preferably native)

Discussion in 'Research' started by J.D. Ray, Feb 1, 2019.

  1. big soft moose

    big soft moose All killer, no filler. Contributor Community Volunteer

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2016
    Messages:
    10,499
    Likes Received:
    11,671
    Location:
    East devon/somerset border
    Possibly

    I've been to finland twice

    The first time was with the army for arctic warfare training and joint exercise with you guys and the norgies - I spent most of my time sat in a snow hole freezing my bollocks off

    The second time was to photograph brown bear, osprey, and wolves... I spent most of my time sat in a hide freezing my bollocks off (actually the bear hide had central heating and bunk beds)

    My take aways were

    1) most of the time its bloody freezing
    2) on the rare occasions its not there are mosquitos big enough to carry off small children
    3) The country has the highest concentration of beautiful women of anywhere on earth (except may be Iceland)
    4) Your army, and in fact most of the men generally, are basically Berzerkers.
    5) Whatever was in those unlabelled bottles that said berzerkers gave us could easily have doubled as rocket fuel, and may well have been drained out of a torpedo.
     
  2. jannert

    jannert Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Messages:
    11,709
    Likes Received:
    12,925
    Location:
    Scotland
    Okay, send your smartass translator to Hamilton, just south of Glasgow. Glesga is a breeze. Hamilton? Or rather, Ahmull'un. I guarantee she will meet her match! :) Oh, and they say 'how?' when they mean 'why?' as well. Fun.
     
  3. jannert

    jannert Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Messages:
    11,709
    Likes Received:
    12,925
    Location:
    Scotland
    A fellow forum member (who shall remain nameless) who is Hungarian helped me sort out the few passages I needed to include in my novel. Totally grateful.
     
    J.D. Ray likes this.
  4. Laurin Kelly

    Laurin Kelly Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2016
    Messages:
    2,162
    Likes Received:
    3,275
    If anyone needs a hookup for Italian translation, I have an amazing native speaker resource who I met when she asked is she could translate one of my fanfics into Italian. She would then translate the reviews left on the fic and send them over to me. I also have a good friend who grew up in France and then moved to Quebec, who's been a big help with French translation for me as well.
     
    J.D. Ray likes this.
  5. Tempest001

    Tempest001 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2019
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Croatia
    I'm from Croatia. If you still need help, I'll be glad to help you out.

    Btw, to clear the air.
    Croatia, Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro. These countries speak very similar language and have no trouble understanding each other.
    All the others, no. Sure, Croatian and Russian both have complex grammar and share few words with each other but that's it. So, except for few random words, there is no way I could understand Russian.
     
    J.D. Ray likes this.
  6. J.D. Ray

    J.D. Ray Member Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2018
    Messages:
    265
    Likes Received:
    156
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon, USA
    Thank you. What I have, updated from what @matwoolf provided earlier, is the following:

    Kojim putem do Pule?” asked Marko. The man stared back quizzically. “Da li je ovo put do Pule?” Marko tried.

    Stranci?” asked the man.

    Marko looked at Celeste, then back to the man. “Da.”

    The man looked back and forth between the two travelers, peering at them suspiciously in the darkness with particular focus on Celeste, pointed down a road and said, “Onom cestom, a zatim skrenite desno” before disappearing into the night.

    “What was all of that?” Celeste asked.

    “I asked him for directions to Pula. He wanted to know if we were foreigners, and I told him we were. That seemed the best explanation. He said to go down this road and turn right. He wasn’t more specific; I hope there’s a sign.”
    Later in the same passage I have this (is 'Croat' appropriately used here?):

    “Look,” said Marko, pointing across the street. A sign on one of the buildings read Sobe, Camere, Zimmer. “They have rooms for rent. Isn’t camere the word for ‘rooms’ in Italian? Sobe is Croat.”

    “It is. And I think the other word is German, though I’m not sure.”

    Marko looked at the building. Three stories tall, it had large windows evenly spaced across the front on the first and second floors. The ground floor had a medium-sized door and two smaller windows with iron-bound shutters; the plaster and stonework were well maintained, and the upper stories were painted a ruddy earth color in contrast to the buildings to the left and right of it, which looked blue or gray in the low light. “It looks reasonably safe. And, as they say, tko ne vaze, nema blaga.

    “And that means…?”

    “‘Nothing ventured, nothing gained.’ Let’s go.”
    In the following chapter, I have this little tidbit; a single word:

    After the man left, Marko stood and examined Celeste’s new set of clothes. He nodded approvingly and smiled at Petra. “Dobro,” he said. It was one of about four Croatian words that Celeste knew, and meant ‘good’. Petra beamed.
    After establishing the language differences, I switched to a format (italicized English) that shows when one person in the scene is left out of the conversation, at least where non-English is in play. Later, after the characters have had time to "acclimatize" and learn the local language, I just switch to a standard dialog format. So, as long as these few phrases are correct Croatian, I think I'm in the clear, at least for now.

    Thank you.

    JD
     
  7. Tempest001

    Tempest001 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2019
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Croatia


    Da li je ovo put do Pule?
    Grammatically more correct term would be Je li ovo put do Pule? but that's based on newest Croatian dictionary and many people still use da li, so leave it be.


    I think Croat means a person from Croatia.

    Sobe
    is Croatian. It sounds more correct to me this way.

    And, as they say, tko ne važe, nema blaga.
    Here, we use a small tick on z, it creates a letter ž (one that doesn't exist in English).

    Everything else, Croatian wise, is correct. But you have to know, this is standard Croatian (the way we speak it now). You wrote somewhere that the novel is set in late 14th century? Back then, we spoke differently. It changed quite a lot through time. I remember reading Judita by Marko Marulić for school. It's first literary work written in Croatian (1501) and I struggled with understanding it.

     
    J.D. Ray likes this.
  8. J.D. Ray

    J.D. Ray Member Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2018
    Messages:
    265
    Likes Received:
    156
    Location:
    Portland, Oregon, USA
    Thanks. Considering most of my readers will be native English speakers (I presume a microscopically small market), I don’t want to go too far off the deep end researching ancient forms of languages. But thank you, this is helpful.

    JD
     

Share This Page