What Are You Reading Now.

Discussion in 'Book Discussion' started by Writing Forums Staff, Feb 22, 2008.

  1. Night Herald

    Night Herald Akrasiarch Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 23, 2012
    Messages:
    1,044
    Likes Received:
    1,698
    Location:
    Norway
    I've embarked on The Dragonbone Chair by Tad Williams, the first in his Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn trilogy. It isn't bad, quite decent actually, but I wouldn't call it amazing yet. It's very slow-going, like the reviews say, though it is supposed to get really good later on. I'm just not sure I care enough to spend 30+ hours with this story, to say nothing of the sequels. We'll see, I guess.

    I'm also reading Wyrd Sisters, my first even non-audiobook Discworld novel. It works just as well in print, I find, though I do apply the voices from my favorite DW narrator Nigel Planer. I've been a bit disappointed with my last few Discworld listens, all of which were later entries to the series; but this early installment is one of the really good ones.
     
    Bone2pick and Krispee like this.
  2. Rad Scribbler

    Rad Scribbler Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2020
    Messages:
    95
    Likes Received:
    126
    Location:
    Here, There, Everywhere
    The Fox by Frederick Forsyth
     
  3. Rzero

    Rzero Reluctant voice of his generation Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2018
    Messages:
    1,286
    Likes Received:
    2,296
    Location:
    Texas
    Lisey's Story by Stephen King. This will make 25 King books for me, about a third of his catalog.
     
  4. Richach

    Richach Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    May 21, 2019
    Messages:
    583
    Likes Received:
    621
    Location:
    Birmingham Uk
    Just starting The Institute by Stephen King today!
     
    Rzero likes this.
  5. Richach

    Richach Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    May 21, 2019
    Messages:
    583
    Likes Received:
    621
    Location:
    Birmingham Uk
    Also going to try and read the 13 or so entries in the short story competition here. :bigwink:
     
    Iain Aschendale and Rzero like this.
  6. Alphonse Capone

    Alphonse Capone Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2016
    Messages:
    115
    Likes Received:
    89
    Location:
    Scotland
    The Bazaar of Bad Dreams by Stephen King. Almost finished it.
     
    Rzero likes this.
  7. Alphonse Capone

    Alphonse Capone Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2016
    Messages:
    115
    Likes Received:
    89
    Location:
    Scotland
    Packing up I counted my Stephen King books, I have 47. Not read them all yet though.
     
    Rzero likes this.
  8. Iain Aschendale

    Iain Aschendale Benevolent Ochlocrat Staff Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2015
    Messages:
    15,719
    Likes Received:
    30,615
    Location:
    Seat 29e, Air Gradia 452
    It's a good collection this month.
     
    Night Herald and Richach like this.
  9. Krispee

    Krispee Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 4, 2012
    Messages:
    1,264
    Likes Received:
    966
    Location:
    UK
    I consider Memory, Sorry, and Thorn one of Tad Williams best fantasy series, overall maybe third in a list, that has The War of the Flowers above it and Otherland his best. Stick with it, it gets better and better, like all fantasy series it has a lot of world building.
    Saying that Otherland is huge, four books, but well worth it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2020
    Night Herald and Bone2pick like this.
  10. MysticalOwl

    MysticalOwl New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2020
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    4
    For fiction I'm half-way through The Bands of Mourning by Brandon Sanderson. It's the third book in a four book series, with the fourth book coming out next year. It is quite good, and Sanderson continues to be my favorite author.

    For non-fiction: I just began On Writing by Stephen King.
     
    Rzero likes this.
  11. Rzero

    Rzero Reluctant voice of his generation Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2018
    Messages:
    1,286
    Likes Received:
    2,296
    Location:
    Texas
    I've read four or five writing manuals now and that's still my favorite by a mile. I think you'll like it.
     
    MysticalOwl likes this.
  12. J.T. Woody

    J.T. Woody Slipping away across the universe Contributor

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2018
    Messages:
    1,518
    Likes Received:
    3,488
    My reading goes through phases.... I guess im back in my non-fiction phase.

    Just finished listening to chapter 3 of Pandoras Lab: 7 stories of science gone wrong and i am in awe:ohno:

    Had to pause the book and run up and drop some sick(cool? Ironic?sad?) facts about Fritz Haber and chemical warfare on a coworker who probably thinks im crazy.

    Next on my docket is Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs?: Big questions from tiny mortals about death. Written by a mortician.
    -sighs- im on the waitlist for it...
     
    Rzero likes this.
  13. .Nameless.

    .Nameless. Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2020
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    35
    Location:
    Chillin' in an igloo, Alaska
    Right now I'm reading If I Die in a Combat Zone, by Tim O'Brien, which is a memoir of his service during the Vietnam War. I'm not a really big memoir kind of guy, but this author has a style that just grabs you & makes you feel what he felt. I was first introduced to him back in High School when we were assigned to read another of his books, The Things They Carried, which is also about Vietnam, but it's a little more like a collection of war stories than an actual memoir. In both books he mixes fact & fiction in a way that tells the real truth, if that makes sense. I'm almost done with it (paperback's page count is in the low 300's), but thankfully I've got a new book that I'm expecting to be delivered in the next few days, Harrow the Ninth, by Tamsyn Muir. This is only her 2nd book & the follow-up to Gideon the Ninth. Basically it's about necromancers....[insert epic echo] in space! [/echo]

    Speaking of Haruki Murakami, I'd suggest The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle and 1Q84. They're both pretty long & you can start to feel that length, but they aren't tiresome like some long books can be.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2020
    Rzero, Xoic and EFMingo like this.
  14. Xoic

    Xoic Prognosticator of Arcana Ridiculosum

    Joined:
    Dec 24, 2019
    Messages:
    2,089
    Likes Received:
    3,265
    Location:
    edge of the spacetime continuum
    I remember reading The Things They Carried (the short story), and I remember it being very powerful. Wasn't it just a list of what the soldiers carried with them? And from that alone you got the idea of what their lives were like.
     
    .Nameless. likes this.
  15. .Nameless.

    .Nameless. Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2020
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    35
    Location:
    Chillin' in an igloo, Alaska
    Pretty much, but it went deeper than just the items they carried. It included the mental burdens as well. The whole book sorta straddles the line between prose & story with its poetic feel. That & the fact that it's not a stereotypical war story is what made me get a copy for myself a few years after I was done with school.
     
    Iain Aschendale and Xoic like this.
  16. Rzero

    Rzero Reluctant voice of his generation Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2018
    Messages:
    1,286
    Likes Received:
    2,296
    Location:
    Texas
    I'm looking forward to the audiobook of The Things They Carried. It's read by Bryan Cranston.
     
  17. Friedrich Kugelschreiber

    Friedrich Kugelschreiber <[:>)-|---< Contributor

    Joined:
    May 8, 2017
    Messages:
    2,020
    Likes Received:
    2,686
    Location:
    The Land of Whimsy
    Well, I finished Phineas Finn by Anthony Trollope. Is it great literature? I don't know. Was it an enjoyable book? Yes, emphatically; although I think Can You Forgive Her? was the better novel of the two. Waiting for Phineas Redux to arrive in the mail.
     
    Larro likes this.
  18. Catrin Lewis

    Catrin Lewis Contributor Contributor Community Volunteer

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2014
    Messages:
    3,723
    Likes Received:
    3,967
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    I've read Can You Forgive Her? but it's been so long I've forgotten the plot.

    Have you read Trollope's Dr. Thorne? If you have, you'll understand what I mean when I say that the day after the 2016 US presidential election, I thought, "Good grief, we've elected Sir Roger Scratcherd!"

    But no more on that. I don't have time to go play in the Debate Room.
     
  19. Friedrich Kugelschreiber

    Friedrich Kugelschreiber <[:>)-|---< Contributor

    Joined:
    May 8, 2017
    Messages:
    2,020
    Likes Received:
    2,686
    Location:
    The Land of Whimsy
    I still have his Barchester novels to look forward to. I've just started reading Trollope this last month and I'm really enjoying it. It's been a great thing for me to find a Victorian author that I can love.
     
    Catrin Lewis likes this.
  20. Larro

    Larro Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2020
    Messages:
    83
    Likes Received:
    150
    Location:
    Bed
    A Joanne Harris double whammy: 'Blackberry Wine' (intrigued by the concept of a bottle of wine as narrator) and 'Ten Things About Writing' (to give myself a good boot up the arse and get back into writing).
     
  21. Friedrich Kugelschreiber

    Friedrich Kugelschreiber <[:>)-|---< Contributor

    Joined:
    May 8, 2017
    Messages:
    2,020
    Likes Received:
    2,686
    Location:
    The Land of Whimsy
    I think I need one of those.
     
    Larro likes this.
  22. Rzero

    Rzero Reluctant voice of his generation Contributor

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2018
    Messages:
    1,286
    Likes Received:
    2,296
    Location:
    Texas
    I'm almost through with Oscar Wilde's Sir Arthur Saville's Crime and Other Stories. I love The Picture of Dorian Gray, and I rather enjoyed his collection of fairy tales, so I thought I'd try this one. I don't generally like short stories as much as novels, but The Canterville Ghost is now one of my favorite shorts ever. Unfortunately, like most collections, the selections are hit or miss. It also contains two of the most boring stories I've ever heard in my life.

    I'm still making my way through Stephen King's Lisey's Story. I would have been done a week ago, but I keep having to put it down so I don't pass out. I can usually count on King to leave out the blood, but this one is full of it. It's not even horror gore, just lots of cutting, which is way worse on my blood phobia than violent blood. Ugh. Quit it, Stephen!
     
  23. Seven Crowns

    Seven Crowns Contributor Contributor

    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2017
    Messages:
    770
    Likes Received:
    1,500
    "The Overstory." I hate this book, but I'm trying to read all the Pulitzers, and it's the newest one that I haven't read. (This is my 20th on the list.) It's killed my page count for the month. It's agony. Imagine a symphony written in the key of C . . . but that's too generous. It's a symphony written in the note of C. Just the same thing, again and again and again and again. The villains are like something out of Mordor. They're just evil for fun. The protagonists are all noble and good and wise. It's Captain Planet in prose. I hate this book.

    So . . . 174 pages to go, that's about 696 more page flips on my kindle. I can't wait! Once I get through this, it's all downhill. I'm going to read Updike, or maybe Lonesome Dove.

    (I hate this book.)

    It's getting one star. There's no way it deserves higher, but I'm going to finish. I set my kindle down after every page and rant. The author apparently researched EVERYTHING about trees and included it. It's all there. History, allegories, science facts. I hate the characters, all of them. They are deranged and they poop a lot. I'm so sick of reading about it. I cannot endure another tree metaphor. I'm rooting for the loggers.

    Rooting? Arrgh! It's infecting me!

    I hate this book.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2020
  24. EFMingo

    EFMingo A Modern Dinosaur Staff Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2014
    Messages:
    2,542
    Likes Received:
    3,922
    Location:
    San Diego, California
    Sounds like Melville and the endless tide of fucking sailing historical facts. That book was brutal to get through. This sounds like the same with trees.
     
    Seven Crowns likes this.
  25. EFMingo

    EFMingo A Modern Dinosaur Staff Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2014
    Messages:
    2,542
    Likes Received:
    3,922
    Location:
    San Diego, California
    I just finished the play M. Butterfly which was fantastic. Never seen a play written so tightly, and so poignant in addressing Orientalism.

    Starting on Girl, Interrupted by Susanna Kayson. Reads a lot like Promising Young Women stylistically, plotwise, and thematically. Actually almost identical...
     
    dbesim, Dogberry's Watch and Rzero like this.

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice