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What new word did you learn today?

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Foxxx, Jan 24, 2019.

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  1. Catriona Grace

    Catriona Grace Member

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    And if you cut it diagonally, you get kitty corners.
     
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  2. Xoic

    Xoic Prognosticator of Arcana Ridiculosum Contributor

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    Irish origins of American slang words:

    Main takeaway—no matter if you spell it, with the E or without, Whiskey is the Water of Life.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2021
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  3. J.T. Woody

    J.T. Woody A Certain Shade of Green Contributor

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    Galumphing
    "moving in a clumsy, ponderous, or noisy manner; inelegant."


    Its also the name of the movement seals make when they move on land
     
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  4. Bone2pick

    Bone2pick Assertive Neophyte Contributor

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    Exchequer
    noun
    a royal or national treasury. "an important source of revenue to the sultan's exchequer"
     
  5. Bone2pick

    Bone2pick Assertive Neophyte Contributor

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    Cadge
    verb INFORMAL ~ BRITISH
    ask for or obtain (something to which one is not strictly entitled). "He eats whenever he can cadge a meal"

    Chandler
    noun HISTORICAL
    a dealer in household items such as oil, soap, paint, and groceries.

    Dray
    noun
    a truck or cart for delivering beer barrels or other heavy loads, especially a low one without sides.
     
  6. J.T. Woody

    J.T. Woody A Certain Shade of Green Contributor

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    Murderabilia- collectables related to murder.


    (Read it in that skin book i mentioned on here... But im also doing research for a person who wants murderabilia from a murder that happened in the 1800s.)
     
  7. Iain Aschendale

    Iain Aschendale Aunt? Supporter Contributor

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    Clive Barker I think?

    "All books are books of blood, for when we're opened we're red."
     
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  8. Mark Burton

    Mark Burton Fried Egghead Supporter Contributor

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    quire
    /kwʌɪə/
    noun
    noun: quire; plural noun: quires
    • four sheets of paper or parchment folded to form eight leaves, as in medieval manuscripts.
    • any collection of leaves one within another in a manuscript or book.
      "the scribe numbered the quires of his manuscript as well as the leaves"
    • 25 (formerly 24) sheets of paper; one twentieth of a ream.
      "the package contained two quires of tracing paper"
     
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  9. Homer Potvin

    Homer Potvin Funky like your grandpa's drawers.... Staff Contributor

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    Looks like you could use it as a shortened form of "inquire."

    "Pa, the hogs escaped!"

    "Go next door and 'quire if anyone's seen em."
     
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  10. Mark Burton

    Mark Burton Fried Egghead Supporter Contributor

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    That's its use as a verb. My definition was as a noun.

    Actually, the reason I looked it up was because a news report said the Queen was seated in the "quire" at the funeral. Ooh, a new word! Nope, I'm fairly certain they should've spelled it "choir"!
     
  11. Homer Potvin

    Homer Potvin Funky like your grandpa's drawers.... Staff Contributor

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    You mean they actually use it as form of "inquire?" I thought I was making it up. Haha.
     
  12. Xoic

    Xoic Prognosticator of Arcana Ridiculosum Contributor

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    So it's also an eggcorn. Quite a versatile word!
     
  13. Mark Burton

    Mark Burton Fried Egghead Supporter Contributor

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    Nope.
     
  14. Iain Aschendale

    Iain Aschendale Aunt? Supporter Contributor

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    Genuinely new for me today:

    That's the google result, for an example consider that people from Germany call it Deutschland, but people from outside call it, well, a lot of different things. Exonyms, to be precise.
     
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  15. Xoic

    Xoic Prognosticator of Arcana Ridiculosum Contributor

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    So, like the way we call it Japan, but (I think) the Japanese call it Nippon? Not sure I've got that right, but if not I guess you'd be the one to set it straight. :supercool:
     
  16. Iain Aschendale

    Iain Aschendale Aunt? Supporter Contributor

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    Yeah, but the Japanese also use Japan. For example, our two international airlines are JAL (Japan Air Lines) and ANA (All Nippon Airways).

    And "Nippon" can be pronounced "Nihon" as well, like in nihongo, which is Japanese for the Japanese language.

    Here's an old article discussing the issue https://apnews.com/article/a5b566c9cfbf2c0f8eb9b1fe589347fd
     
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  17. Xoic

    Xoic Prognosticator of Arcana Ridiculosum Contributor

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    And it reminds me of the variations on names (of people) in different languages. Just as an example, some of the variations on the name John include:
    • Johan
    • Johanna (also the Dutch diminutives Johanneke, Hanneke, Janneke, and Joke)
    • Jens
    • Hans
    • Joao (supposed to be some kind of accent mark I don't know how to make)
    • Jehan
    • Jehanne (this is how Joan of Arc spelled her name)
    I'm just gonna drop this in straight from Wiki:

    In Welsh, the name John is rendered as Ieuan (pronounced [ˈjəɨ̯an]), Ifan (pronounced [ˈɪvan]), Iwan (pronounced [ˈɪu̯an]), Ioan (pronounced [ˈjoːan]) or, borrowed from English, Siôn (pronounced [ˈʃoːn]). A pet form is Ianto (pronounced [ˈjantɔ]). Ifan eventually became rendered into English as Evan. In Irish, it is written as (pronounced [ˈoːənˠ]), Eóin, (pronounced [ˈoːənʲ]) or Seán

    There's an almost endless list. Check it if you want: John (given name) @ Wikipedia
     
  18. Javelineer

    Javelineer Member

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    Technically not learning a new word, but I found that "palisade" can be used as a verb. Which I intend to find an excuse to do.

    "The rebellious peasants opted to palisade the approaches to their village in expectation of the magistrate's reinforcements."
     
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  19. Bone2pick

    Bone2pick Assertive Neophyte Contributor

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    Dry-gulch
    verb
    to ambush with the intent of killing or severely mauling. "The riders were dry-gulched by bandits."

    Mountebank
    noun
    a person who deceives others, especially in order to trick them out of their money; a charlatan.

    Rictus
    noun
    a fixed grimace or grin. "Ned's smile had become a rictus of repulsion"
     
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  20. Naomasa298

    Naomasa298 HP: 12/210 MP: 0/130 Contributor

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    This is strange. This word came up today for me on another forum, discussing the name "Eskimo", which is an exonym.
     
  21. Naomasa298

    Naomasa298 HP: 12/210 MP: 0/130 Contributor

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    But the official name of JAL is "Nihon Kōkū Kabushiki-gaisha". I know everyone just calls it JAL though.
     
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  22. Homer Potvin

    Homer Potvin Funky like your grandpa's drawers.... Staff Contributor

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    One of my favorites... when in doubt, throw rictus in a sentence!
     
  23. Naomasa298

    Naomasa298 HP: 12/210 MP: 0/130 Contributor

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    [​IMG]
     
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  24. Friedrich Kugelschreiber

    Friedrich Kugelschreiber Contributor Contributor

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    Dun: verb, to make persistent demands on (someone), especially for payment of a debt.

    Politesse: noun, formal politeness or etiquette.
     
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  25. Xoic

    Xoic Prognosticator of Arcana Ridiculosum Contributor

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    How would one use that in a sentence? Man, quit dunnin' me dude!
     

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