1. frygurl
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    frygurl Member

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    Publishing to Ebooks

    Discussion in 'Publishing' started by frygurl, Dec 3, 2010.

    An ebook publisher has expressed interest in publishing my novel. The thing is, my book if for young adults, 13-19. Are teens even using ebooks? I see college age kids using them, but not so much the jr. high and high school group. Does anyone know?
     
  2. Youniquee
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    Youniquee (◡‿◡✿) Contributor

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    Hmm, I'm in that age range, and I don't use e-books, only when reading fan fiction. I prefer Traditional Books. Hard back and stuff. If you see what I mean.
     
  3. frygurl
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    frygurl Member

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    Thanks for the input - I do know what you mean. I'm a techie person but I would rather hold a paper book or magazine in my hand.
     
  4. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    find out for yourself... google for e-books currently on sale for that age range and see how well [or not] they're selling...
     
  5. Michael Daaboul
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    Michael Daaboul Member

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    That is a personal preference. Depending on how well this publisher will market your e-book?

    As for who uses e-books? No doubt it's the way into the future for publishing, but at this point in time I haven't seen or noticed much activity with e-books for that age range.

    But you never know. It depends on what format the e-book will be in? E-book readers can be expensive, so would the e-book be compatible on a laptop? Most likely.

    At the same time, you might be surprised.
     
  6. OvershadowedGuy
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    OvershadowedGuy Member

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    If you're being offered a publishing of any sort, you should take it.
     
  7. SashaMerideth
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    SashaMerideth Contributing Member

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    If you need to shell out even a dime, I'd be cautious of them. How will they publicize your ebook, where will it be distributed from... these are important questions.
     
  8. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    Creating the e-book is the least of the issues. Publishing involves determining whether the book truly is marketable (which is why submissions editors are so tough to please), laying it out in an appealing form, producing it for volume distribution (that's the creation part, plus providing a server that can handle high volume), marketing and advertising, and handling legal issues (not only copyright, but avoiding problems over libel or invasion of privacy, etc).

    There's a lot more to publishing than packaging a manuscript in a readable, distributable form. Personally, I'd rather put my efforts into writing, and expend less of my precious resources (i.e. finite time) on aspects in which others have developed expertise over decades. Sure, I expect to be called in for book signings and other promotions work, but I also expect to take advantage of others' expertise where it makes sense (and cents) to do so.
     
  9. eden baylee
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    eden baylee Member

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    E-books is a growing market for all readers, and there are plenty of books for young adults sold online now.

    I agree with Cogito - leave the publishing of it, in whichever format, up to the publisher. Feel good about potentially having your book out there, and concentrate on writing your next one.
     
  10. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    not good advice, imo... there are good publishing deals and there are contracts from hell... and going for a really bad deal, or with a known-to-be-'bad' publisher [e.g., PA] can do much more harm to a new writer's career chances, than good...
     
  11. dizzyspell
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    dizzyspell Active Member

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    I heard on the News tonight that the 'E-Reader' is taking off pre-Christmas (it broke my heart a little), so it looks like that medium is beginning to flourish. With young people so digitally savvy nowadays, its likely that age group may be getting into e-books too.

    Also, the mother of one of the guys I used to work with got published, initially in e-book form, and her book has now been released in paperback form. So I think with the rise of e-books, publishers may be using that sort of release to 'test the waters', more and more.

    Your publisher will, as others have said, know best how to market your novel. They're invested in it as well!
     
  12. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    Whether it flourishes or not, your competition will be books that are already published in the conventional way, and have the marketing clout (or author's existing fame) behind them. You are also competing against all the new writers who come up with the original thought, "Wow! With this new technology, ANYONE can become a published author and get rich and famous!"
     
  13. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    REPENT! The end is nigh!!!
     
  14. Islander
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    Islander Contributing Member Contributor

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    Also, you don't need an ebook reader to read ebooks. They can be read on many cell phones, especially those with large screens, like iPhones, Blueberries and Androids. Perhaps sufficently many teens can be convinced to download them to their phone with the right marketing.

    I use my iPhone to read ebooks, and don't really feel a need for a bigger screen... it's easier to read when the lines are short, and flipping to the next page only requires a quick flick.
     

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